Studied music theory and initial practice, I’m going to look at bringing a song up to a polished condition and performance worthy.

Now that I understand the structure and flow of the song I need to move into stage two and that is to connect all the pieces or my practice chunks of the song.

Today, an example of how applied music theory, in practice, pays off. In three weeks I’ll be performing for my father’s 80th birthday. Of course I’d pull out a couple of songs that I am very proficient in playing to see if they fit the mark. But then I have been thrown a curve ball!

When playing arpeggios I find this is the first place I lose my dexterity and skill when I don’t take the time to keep up on them. Here a couple of techniques to improve your practice.

Practicing or playing music scales can be a boring task for many music students. This is because the practice of grouping notes is not well communicated to the student.

Approaching the Piano or keyboard. Some teach that the high wrist and holding your hands up is the way to start however, others believe that a relaxed light resting of the hands at the keyboard is the way to go. Here’s a couple of ideas to help you explore your approach.

The approach and attack one applies to the striking the keys on the piano can make all the difference in the world to the sound that is produced.

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